Rubens school "Virgin, Jesus, St. John and St. Elizabeth"

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Thomas Willeboirts - Madonna col Bambino, San Giovanni ed Elisabetta.jpg
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Stemma Maynard.jpg
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A 57591 2   .jpg
Thomas Willeboirts - Madonna col Bambino, San Giovanni ed Elisabetta.jpg
A 57587  jpg.jpg
Stemma Maynard.jpg
petochi 1.png

Rubens school "Virgin, Jesus, St. John and St. Elizabeth"

20,000.00

A XVIIth century Flemish school very fine oil on copper representing the Virgin with baby Jesus, St. John and St. Elizabeth in a later gilt frame of the 19th century.

Excellent condition commensurate with age, light restorations.

The size of the painting is cm 31 x 24 ca.

Flemish School of the 17th century attributed to Thomas Willeboirts Bosschaert (1613-1654), as indicated in an aquatint of the 1774 that indicates even the measures of 9.5 x 13.5 inches and that places it in the cabinet at Houghton Hall, Norfolk, in the collection of Sir. Robert Walpole (1676-1745), first Earl of Oxford and British prime minister, who had bought it in 1722 from the succession of William Van Huls.

In 1779, due to the huge debt accumulated by the family, the fourth Earl of Oxford, Horace Walpole, was forced to sell most of the collection of paintings to Catherine the 2nd of Russia. The painting is mentioned in the work "Aedes Walpolianae" written by the same Horace Walpole, in which he lists all the paintings collected in the family home of Houghton Hall,Norfolk, before they were dispersed. The painting was among those purchased by Catherine the Great and appears in the catalogs of paintings belonging to the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, until 1916. After that date, with the October Revolution, track of the painting was lost. It was probably taken from the museum and sold to repay the costs of the coup as many other goods of the Romanov family.

On the back bears the handwritten name MAYNARD, with great probability that refers to a previous collection of which the painting was part of, before becoming a part of Robert Walpole's.

The Maynard family, first titled in 1608, had the titles of Barons, Baronetts and Viscounts. All its components to extinction of the dynasty were members of the House of Lords in the parliament for Essex County.

 

Thomas Willeboirts Bosschaert (1613 – 23 January 1654) was a Dutch-born Flemish Baroque painter. Willeboirts Bosschaert was born in Bergen op Zoom, where his Catholic family had moved in the late sixteenth century. He moved to Antwerp in 1628, and entered the studio of Gerard Seghers for eight years. In 1636 or 1637 he became an Antwerp citizen and joined the Guild of St. Luke. He died in Antwerp. 

His style is heavily influenced by Anthony van Dyck, both in history and portrait, leading some scholars to suggest that Willeboirts might have studied in that studio. The artist ran his own studio with at least nine known pupils, and collaborated with other artists of the time such as Daniel Seghers, Paul de Vos, Jan Fyt, Jan van den Hoecke, Frans Snyders and Adriaen van Utrecht, as well as with Peter Paul Rubens on the decoration series for Philip IV of Spain's Torre de la Parada (1636–1638). Between 1641 and 1647 he also worked for the Dutch stadtholder Frederik Hendrik of Orange. Hendrik's widow, Amalia von Solms also commissioned a work from Willeboirts for the decorations of the Oranjezaal (Orange Room) in the Huis ten Bosch, a decorative program that included both Dutch and Flemish masters. In 1653, a competition was held in Antwerp between him and Cornelis Schut to create an altarpiece with money that had been allocated for Van Dyck before his death. Schut's painting, The Martyrdom of St. George (Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp), won. Willeboirts made the grisaille centerpieces for two of Daniel Seghers garland paintings. For one of these Seghers was awarded with a solid gold maulstick, and Willeboirts was given a hundred guilders.

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